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Treating the modern atopic veterinary patient

Fecha01/03/2019 (CET)
Tiempo02:00 - 03:00 (CET)
altavozMichelle LeRoy
Gratis
Descriptions

The evolution of veterinary dermatology and available pharmaceutical options for treatment of atopic dermatitis has changed significantly in the recent past. This lecture will review a wide array of treatment options both old and new for atopic dogs and cats including immunotherapy, antihistamines, fatty acids, steroids, Oclacitinib (Apoquel®), Cyclosporine (Atopica®), and lokivetmab (Cytopoint®). We will discuss how these therapies benefit the atopic patient and when each treatment is appropriate. Learn what side effects to beware of, how to better educate your clients, and when referral to a dermatologist is helpful.

This webinar is RACE approved and qualifies for one (1) hour of continuing education.

altText

Michelle LeRoy, DVM, DACVD

Michelle LeRoy practices veterinary dermatology at the Veterinary Allergy and Dermatology Clinic in Overland Park, KS. She received her Bachelor of Science in biology with a minor in French from Kansas State University in 2008. She continued her education by completing a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 2012 from Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Upon completion of her degree, she completed a one-year rotating small animal internship at VCA Mission Animal Referral and Emergency Center in Mission, KS and then worked for a short time in general practice. She then completed a three-year residency under the guidelines of the American College of Veterinary Dermatology both at Veterinary Allergy and Dermatology Clinic and the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine in Columbia, MO. Dr. LeRoy achieved Diplomate status with the American College of Veterinary Dermatology in 2016. She is currently an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine where she teaches dermatology coursework and is a clinical instructor in the Veterinary Health Center. Dr. LeRoy also enjoys traveling, following her favorite sports teams, and spending time with her family, dog Sophie, and cats.

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